Cory Leonard

Should You Love Your Job? Expectations and the Rest of Your Life

In career on May 23, 2014 at 8:22 pm

 

An argument about unhappiness among recent college graduates–a particular subclass–and at best, an effort to explain how social media plays into misshapen expectations about post-collegiate life.  Also, a great implicit argument for a broad liberal education–as that will help you figure out what a good life is, after all.

Sure, some people from Lucy’s parents’ high school or college classes ended up more successful than her parents did.  And while they may have heard about some of it from time to time through the grapevine, for the most part they didn’t really know what was going on in too many other peoples’ careers.

Lucy, on the other hand, finds herself constantly taunted by a modern phenomenon: Facebook Image Crafting.

Social media creates a world for Lucy where A) what everyone else is doing is very out in the open, B) most people present an inflated version of their own existence, and C) the people who chime in the most about their careers are usually those whose careers (or relationships) are going the best, while struggling people tend not to broadcast their situation.  This leaves Lucy feeling, incorrectly, like everyone else is doing really well, only adding to her misery:

via wait but why: Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy.

 

Another aspect to this comes from unrealistic expectations about he working world.  One common message from higher education is to “do what you love”–but the reality experienced by alumni is much different.

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

And if we did that, more of us could get around to doing what it is we really love.

via Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers..

Take Gordon Merino, waxing all philosophical about the topic.  He back up the issue to Kant, asking the big question of what work we should do, noting that “doing what you love” rarely plays into the career plan for society’s most important figures:

The universally recognized paragons of humanity — the Nelson Mandelas, Dietrich Bonhoeffers and Martin Luther Kings — did not organize their lives around self-fulfillment and bucket lists. They, no doubt, found a sense of meaning in their heroic acts of self-sacrifice, but they did not do what they were doing in order to achieve that sense of meaning. They did — like my father and some of those kids from town — what they felt they had to do.

Dr. King taught that every life is marked by dimensions of length, breadth and height. Length refers to self-love, breadth to the community and care of others, and height to the transcendent, to something larger than oneself. Most would agree with Dr. King’s prescription that self-fulfillment requires being able to relate yourself to something higher than the self. Traditionally, that something “higher” was code for God, but whatever the transcendent is, it demands obedience and the willingness to submerge and remold our desires.

via Opionator | The Stone | A life beyond do what you love.

 

 

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